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Year : 2014  |  Volume : 32  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 99-

Anti-microbial susceptibility: Interpretation necessary with reference to a standard guideline

D Das1, AD Roy2,  
1 Departments of Microbiology, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Medical Sciences, Tadong, East Sikkim, India
2 Department of Pathology, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Medical Sciences, Tadong, East Sikkim, India

Correspondence Address:
D Das
Departments of Microbiology, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Medical Sciences, Tadong, East Sikkim
India

How to cite this article:
Das D, Roy A D. Anti-microbial susceptibility: Interpretation necessary with reference to a standard guideline.Indian J Med Microbiol 2014;32:99-99

How to cite this URL:
Das D, Roy A D. Anti-microbial susceptibility: Interpretation necessary with reference to a standard guideline. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2014 [cited 2020 Oct 31 ];32:99-99
Available from: https://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2014/32/1/99/124353

Full Text

Dear Editor,

This is regarding one article by Suneeth N, Teena MM, Usha V, Mary J 'Microbiological profile of orbital abscess' (2012);30 (3):317-22 [1] published in the Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology. In this article authors retrospectively reviewed 56 patients with orbital abscess between January 1995 and May 2011. They have elaborately evaluated primary source of infection, organisms cultured, their sensitivity patterns, empirical antibiotic therapy administered and the requirements for change of antibiotic regime. This is indeed a very useful article to know the bacteriological profile of orbital abscesses. They have mentioned about the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of all the isolates but have not mentioned about any standard guideline used for interpreting anti-microbial susceptibility of the isolates. In the sensitivity pattern obtained, they have mentioned that Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from the 3 rd case and the 6 th case was sensitive to vancomycin and cephalaxin and Enterobacter spp. isolated from 10 th case was also sensitive to vancomycin as mentioned in of the article. But, according to CLSI guidelines there are no interpretative criteria available for vancomycin and cephalaxin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and for vancomycin against Enterobacter spp. [2] Vancomycin is a drug used exclusively for Gram positive organism. Moreover, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other Gram negative organisms are intrinsically resistant to vancomycin. [3],[4] Early and appropriate management of orbital abscess is very essential as delay in treatment may lead to poor outcome like visual loss. Along with surgical management proper administration of antibiotic plays a pivotal role in the management. Hence, an antibiotic sensitivity report interpreted with reference to a standard guideline would guide the treating ophthalmologist in initiating proper management and thus benefit the patient.

References

1Suneeth N, Teena MM, Usha V, Mary J. Microbiological profile of orbital abscess. Indian J Med Microbiol 2012;30:317-22.
2Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Performance standards for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. 22 nd Informational supplement. CLSI document M100-S22. Wayne, PA: Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; 2012.
3Forbes BA, Sahm DF, Weissfeld AS. Principles of Antimicrobial action and resistance. In: Bailey and Scott's Diagnostic Microbiology, 12 th ed, Ch 11. St. Louis: The CV Mosby Company; 2007. p. 172.
4Livermore DM, Winstanley TG, Shannon KP. Interpretative reading: Recognizing the unusual and inferring resistance mechanisms from resistance phenotypes. J Antimicrob Chemother 2001 Jul;48 Suppl 1:87-102.