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Year : 2006  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 236-

Isolation and methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from hospital personnels

S Zahoor1, C Vaishnavi2, S Kaur2, A Bhatia1,  
1 Department of Biotechnology, Punjabi University, Patiala - 147 002, India
2 Department of Gastroenterology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical, Educational and Research, Chandigarh, Punjab - 160 012, India

Correspondence Address:
A Bhatia
Department of Biotechnology, Punjabi University, Patiala - 147 002
India

How to cite this article:
Zahoor S, Vaishnavi C, Kaur S, Bhatia A. Isolation and methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from hospital personnels.Indian J Med Microbiol 2006;24:236-236

How to cite this URL:
Zahoor S, Vaishnavi C, Kaur S, Bhatia A. Isolation and methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from hospital personnels. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2006 [cited 2020 Nov 25 ];24:236-236
Available from: https://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2006/24/3/236/27006

Full Text

Dear Editor,

Nosocomial infections are one of the occupational biohazards which affect the health of workers with or without predisposing factors. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the major pathogens associated with community-acquired serious nosocomial infection because these strains generally show multiple drug resistance which limits treatment possibilities.[1] MRSA has become established outside the hospital environment and is now appearing in community populations without identifiable risk factors.[2] Hence, there is always a need to screen individuals exposed to such infection. In the present study, hospital personnels were screened for the incidence of S. aureus and MRSA.

Swab samples collected from the hands of 174 hospital personnels which included 44 doctors, 71 nurses and 59 hospital attendants were screened for S. aureus employing conventional microbiological methods.[3],[4] Risk factors like age, sex, health status, nature of job and place of work were taken into consideration while analyzing the results. The rate of S. aureus positivity in the samples collected from doctors, nursing staff and hospital attendants was 32, 40 and 39%. Percentage of total methicillin resistance was 15.38%. Further, the results revealed that 7, 25 and 9% was methicillin resistance in the samples collected from doctors, nursing staff and hospital attendants respectively.

The analyses of the data showed a higher prevalence of S. aureus in nursing staff and attendants compared to the doctors. Age, sex, health status could not be correlated with the rate of infection, however, it could be due to the nature of job and place of work of the individuals. The prevalence of S. aureus was found higher in surgical wards than the general wards. Our study shows that the risk of infection is higher in individuals occupationally exposed to such microbes. MRSA has been reported earlier from hospitals in various parts of world.[5] There is a need to screen individuals in hospitals for risk exposures and infections, to avoid outbreak and cross infections.

References

1Albertini MT, Benoit C, Berardi L, Berrounane Y, Boisivon A, Cahen P, et al . Surveillance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterobacteriaceae producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBLE) in Northern France: A five-year multicenter incidence study. J Hosp Infect 2002; 52 :107-13.
2Herold BC, Immergluck LC, Maranan MC, Lauderdale DS, Gaskin RE, Boyle-Vavra S, et al . Community-acquired methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus in children with no identified predisposing risk. JAMA 1998; 279 :593-8.
3Kloos WE, Bannerman TL. Staphylococcus and Micrococcus in Manual of Clinical Microbiology. Murray PR (editor). 6th ed. American society of Microbiology Press: Washington DC; 1995. p. 282-98.
4National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Performance standards for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Ninth informational supplement. National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Villanova PA: 1999.
5Panlilio AL, Culver DH, Gaynes RP, Banerjee S, Henderson TS, Tolson JS, et al . Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in U.S hospitals, 1975-1991. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 1992; 13 :582-6.