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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 38  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 379-384

Prevalence of torch infections and its associated poor outcome in high-risk pregnant women of Central India: Time to think for prevention strategies


1 Division of In vivo Research, ICMR-National Institute of Research in Tribal Health, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, NSCB Medical College, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India
3 Division of Genetic Disorder, ICMR-National Institute of Research in Tribal Health, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India
4 Division of Social Science and Ethnomedicine, ICMR-National Institute of Research in Tribal Health, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India
5 Division of Virology and Zoonoses, ICMR-National Institute of Research in Tribal Health, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Pradip V Barde
Division of Virology and Zoonoses, ICMR-National Institute of Research in Tribal Health, Jabalpur - 482 003, Madhya Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmm.IJMM_20_136

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Introduction: The TORCH infections during pregnancy are associated with adverse congenital abnormalities, poor foetal outcome and subsequent reproductive failures. The absence of baseline data on status of TORCH infections and associated foetal outcomes prompted us to conduct the current study in Central India. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 high-risk pregnant women attending tertiary care unit, suspected for TORCH infections were enrolled from August 2017 to December 2018. All the participants were tested for the presence of IgM and IgG antibodies and followed up to record the foetal outcome. Results: The overall TORCH infection (IgM positivity) positivity rate was 61.1% (88/144). Rubella was the most prevalent infection (46.5%) followed by herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2 (41%) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) (34.7%). The highest IgG sero-positivity was recorded against CMV (88.6%), followed by Rubella (86.8%), HSV 1 and 2 (28.4%), and toxoplasmosis (15.2%). Follow-up of IgM TORCH positive pregnant women revealed that majority of the neonates/infants are having congenital cardiac abnormalities (39.2%), followed by microcephaly/hydrocephaly (25%), low birth weight (10.7%), and deafness (3.6%). Thirty-two percent of neonatal mortality was associated to multiple TORCH infections. Conclusion: A high prevalence of IgM seropositivity of TORCH infection was noted in the present study with the increased rate of poor foetal outcome warrants the need of proper prenatal counselling, universal immunisation and nutritional supplements during pregnancy.






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