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Year : 2019  |  Volume : 37  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 345--350

Detection and molecular typing of campylobacter isolates from human and animal faeces in coastal belt of Odisha, India

Nirmal Kumar Mohakud1, Saumya Darshana Patra2, Subrat Kumar2, Priyadarshi Soumyaranjan Sahu3, Namrata Misra4, Arpit Kumar Shrivastava2 
1 Department of Paediatrics, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
2 Department of Biotechnology, Infection Biology Laboratory, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
3 Department of Biotechnology, Infection Biology Laboratory, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of the Americas, Devens, MA, USA
4 Department of Biotechnology, KIIT-Technology Business Incubator, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Arpit Kumar Shrivastava
Department of Biotechnology, Infection Biology Laboratory, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar - 751 024, Odisha
India

Introduction: Campylobacter-mediated diarrhoea is one of the major causes of gastroenteritis globally. A majority of the Campylobacter spp. that cause disease in humans have been isolated from animals. Faecal contamination of food and water is the identified frequent cause of human campylobacteriosis. Methodology: In the present study, faecal samples from patients with symptoms of acute diarrhoea (n = 310) and domestic animals including cows (n = 60), sheep (n = 45) and goats (n = 45) were collected from the same localities in the peri-urban Bhubaneswar city. Genomic DNA isolation followed by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing was employed to analyse Campylobacter spp.-positive samples. Results: Of the 460 faecal samples, 16.77% of human samples and 25.33% of animal samples were found to be positive for Campylobacter spp. Among animals, the isolation rate was highest in sheep followed by cows and goats with 9.33%, 8.66% and 7.33%, respectively. The highest number of Campylobacter-positive cases was diagnosed in infants of 2–5 years age. Concurrent infection of other pathogens in addition to Campylobacter spp. was frequently detected in the samples. Conclusion: The present study showed the incidence of Campylobacter infections in human and different animal species in and around Bhubaneswar, Odisha. The analysis suggested that domestic animals can be the potential sources for human campylobacteriosis in the region.

How to cite this article:
Mohakud NK, Patra SD, Kumar S, Sahu PS, Misra N, Shrivastava AK. Detection and molecular typing of campylobacter isolates from human and animal faeces in coastal belt of Odisha, India.Indian J Med Microbiol 2019;37:345-350

How to cite this URL:
Mohakud NK, Patra SD, Kumar S, Sahu PS, Misra N, Shrivastava AK. Detection and molecular typing of campylobacter isolates from human and animal faeces in coastal belt of Odisha, India. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Aug 6 ];37:345-350
Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/article.asp?issn=0255-0857;year=2019;volume=37;issue=3;spage=345;epage=350;aulast=Mohakud;type=0