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Year : 2015  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 538--546

Ocular infections caused by Candida species: Type of species, in vitro susceptibility and treatment outcome

SR Motukupally1, VR Nanapur1, KN Chathoth1, SI Murthy2, RR Pappuru3, A Mallick4, S Sharma1 
1 Jhaveri Microbiology Centre, Lakshmi Vara Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
2 Cornea and Anterior Segment Service, Lakshmi Vara Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
3 Smt. Kanuri Santhamma Retina-Vitreous Service, Lakshmi Vara Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
4 Ocular Microbiology Service, Lakshmi Vara Prasad Eye Institute, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
S Sharma
Jhaveri Microbiology Centre, Lakshmi Vara Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana
India

Purpose: To report clinical and microbiological profile of patients with ocular candidiasis. Materials and Methods: Patients with ocular candidiasis were retrospectively identified from microbiology records. Significant isolates of Candida species were identified by Vitek 2 compact system. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antifungal agents such as amphotericin B, itraconazole, voriconazole, fluconazole and caspofungin was determined by E test and of natamycin by microbroth dilution assay. Data on treatment and outcome were collected from medical records. Results: A total of 42 isolates of Candida were isolated from patients with keratitis-29, endophthalmitis-12 and orbital cellulitis-1. The most common species isolated was Candida albicans (12-keratitis, 4-endophthalmitis, 1-orbital cellulitis). All except one isolate were susceptible to amphotericin B. MIC of caspofungin was in the susceptible range in 28 (96.5%) corneal isolates while 12 out of 29 (41.3%) corneal isolates were sensitive to fluconazole. Resistance to voriconazole was seen in four corneal isolates. All isolates were susceptible to natamycin and all except two isolates were resistant or susceptible dose-dependent to itraconazole. Outcome of healed ulcer was achieved in 12/18 (66.6%) patients treated medically, while surgical intervention was required in 11 patients. Among the isolates from endophthalmitis patients, 11/12 were susceptible to amphotericin B, 6/12 to voriconazole and all to natamycin. Ten out of 11 patients (one patient required evisceration) with endophthalmitis were given intravitreal amphotericin B injection with variable outcome. Conclusions: Ocular candidiasis needs early and specific treatment for optimal results. Candida species continue to be susceptible to most commonly available antifungals including amphotericin B, voriconazole and natamycin.

How to cite this article:
Motukupally S R, Nanapur V R, Chathoth K N, Murthy S I, Pappuru R R, Mallick A, Sharma S. Ocular infections caused by Candida species: Type of species, in vitro susceptibility and treatment outcome.Indian J Med Microbiol 2015;33:538-546

How to cite this URL:
Motukupally S R, Nanapur V R, Chathoth K N, Murthy S I, Pappuru R R, Mallick A, Sharma S. Ocular infections caused by Candida species: Type of species, in vitro susceptibility and treatment outcome. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2015 [cited 2020 Aug 4 ];33:538-546
Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/article.asp?issn=0255-0857;year=2015;volume=33;issue=4;spage=538;epage=546;aulast=Motukupally;type=0