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Year : 2007  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 176--177

Screening of the family members of patients with acute Brucellosis in Southeast Iran

B Sharifi - Mood, M Metanat, R Alavi - Naini 
 Research Centre for Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
B Sharifi - Mood
Research Centre for Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan
Iran

How to cite this article:
Sharifi - Mood B, Metanat M, Alavi - Naini R. Screening of the family members of patients with acute Brucellosis in Southeast Iran.Indian J Med Microbiol 2007;25:176-177

How to cite this URL:
Sharifi - Mood B, Metanat M, Alavi - Naini R. Screening of the family members of patients with acute Brucellosis in Southeast Iran. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2007 [cited 2019 Dec 6 ];25:176-177
Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2007/25/2/176/32737

Full Text

Dear Editor,

Brucellosis is primarily an animal disease. Exposure to infected animals and animal products causes the disease in human. [1],[2] Acute brucellosis among household members of an index case have been reported. [3] In order to determine whether active serological screening of the family members of patients with acute brucellosis will detect additional unrecognized cases, we conducted this study. From September 2005 to December 2006, a total of 378 of household members of patients with acute brucellosis (69 families) who were referred to Boo-Ali Hospital (Southeast Iran) were enrolled in this study and serologically screened for brucellosis using the standard agglutination test (SAT). Titer of 160 or more was considered positive and diagnostic Titer of more than 160 in conjunction with compatible clinical presentation was considered to be highly suggestive of acute infection. Also, titer more than 160 in conjunction with 2 mercapto ethanol test >160 in asymptomatic group, were considered to be acute infection.

Out of the 69 families screened, 33 (48%) had two family members or more with serological evidence of brucellosis. Thirteen families had three family members with positive serologic tests, 10 families; four cases, seven families; two cases, two families; five cases and one family had six household members with serological evidence of brucellosis. Of the 378 family members screened, 77(20%) were seropositive and of these 47 (61%) were symptomatic . The majority (30(63.8%)) of the symptomatic family members had a high brucella titer (> 640) in comparison to three (10%) of the asymptomatic group ( P [3] In recent study, acute brucellosis was diagnosed and treated in 18 (78%) of the symptomatic seropositive family members and in four (36%) of the asymptomatic seropositive family members and acute brucellosis prevalence rate was seen in 22 household members (12%). [3] Other study from Southern Israel evaluated 86 family members of index cases of acute brucellosis. [4] Symptomatic brucellosis was found in eight (9%) of the screened population and an additional 5 (6%) asymptomatic individuals were found to be seropositive. [4] Peru study showed that in an endemic area in Lima (Peru), in 39 families with 232 members, there was a high rate of symptomatic infection (118/232, 50.9%). [5] Symptomatic family members were more likely to be seropositive with a high titer in comparison to the asymptomatic members. This result was also seen in the present study.

In conclusion, screening family members of an index case of acute brucellosis will detect additional cases and improve the treatment, because, all family members may be exposed to a common source.

References

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2Troy SB, Rickman LS, Davis CE. Brucellosis in San Diego: Epidemiology and species-related differences in acute clinical presentations. Medicine 2005; 84: 174-87.
3Alsubaie S, Almuneef M, Alshaalan M, Balkhy H, Albanyan E, Alola S, et al . Acute brucellosis in Saudi families: Relationship between brucella serology and clinical symptoms. Int J Infect Dis 2005; 9: 218-24.
4Abramson O, Rosenvasser Z, Block C, Dagan R. Detection and treatment of brucellosis by screening a population at risk. Pediatr Infect Dis J 1991; 10: 434-8.
5Gotuzzo E, Carrillo C, Seas C, Guerra J, Maguina C. Epidemiological and clinical features of brucellosis in 39 family groups. Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin 1989; 7: 519-24.