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Year : 2005  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 273--274

Prevalence of hepatitis C and B viral markers in patients with chronic liver disease: A study from Northern India

A Chakravarti, V Verma 
 Department of Microbiology, Maulana Azad College and Associated Lok Nayak Hospitals, New Delhi - 110 002, India

Correspondence Address:
A Chakravarti
Department of Microbiology, Maulana Azad College and Associated Lok Nayak Hospitals, New Delhi - 110 002
India

How to cite this article:
Chakravarti A, Verma V. Prevalence of hepatitis C and B viral markers in patients with chronic liver disease: A study from Northern India.Indian J Med Microbiol 2005;23:273-274

How to cite this URL:
Chakravarti A, Verma V. Prevalence of hepatitis C and B viral markers in patients with chronic liver disease: A study from Northern India. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2005 [cited 2019 Nov 13 ];23:273-274
Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2005/23/4/273/17088

Full Text

Dear Editor,

We wish to share our experience on the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) during two year study period. Both of these viruses are transmitted mainly through the parenteral route and therefore a dual infection of these viruses occurs and even persists in the same patient. Seroprevalence studies have also shown coinfection of HBV and HCV, although prevalence may vary from area to area and country to country.[1] In view of this the present study was designed to determine the prevalence of HCV and HBV infection and coinfection of HBV in HCV patients with chronic liver disease.

A total of one hundred and thirty two patients with chronic liver disease, attending the out patient department (OPD) or admitted in the wards of Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi during the year Jan 2003 to December 2004 were studied. The study group comprised of 104 male and 28 female patients. The mean age of the patients was 16-72 years. (43.5 + 1.7 years). Five millilitre of blood sample was collected aseptically and serum was separated, aliquoted and stored at -20C until tested. Anti -HCV, HBsAg, Anti-HBc IgM, Anti-HBc IgG were detected by using commercially available kits with known positive and negative controls

In the present study, HBV infection was detected in 80 (60.6%) cases using all the three markers: HBs Ag (44 cases), anti-HBc IgM (13 cases), anti-HBc IgG (80 cases), similar findings were reported by other workers.[2] HCV infection was present in thirty-four (25.75%) patients with CLD which is in accordance with our earlier study.[3] Twenty-seven (79.41%) cases of hepatitis C patients showed coinfection with HBV (past or present infection); HBsAg was present in 38.23% (13/34), anti-HBc IgM in 5.8% (2/34) and anti-HBc IgG in 79.41% (27/34). In the previous study by Singh et al ,[4] it was reported that the prevalence of anti-HCV was higher as compared to HBV in CLD, since only two viral markers i.e., anti HBc IgM and HBsAg were studied. Anti-HBc IgG, an important viral marker for knowing the exposure to HBV in these cases, was not tested and that might be one of the reasons for getting a lower prevalence of HBV as compared to HCV. Eighteen cases of CLD in the present study were cryptogenic (negative for both HCV and HBV). Probably certain HCV variants or other hepatotropic viruses like hepatitis G virus (HGV) or transfusion transmissible virus (TTV) or SEN viruses were present.

Thus, it is concluded from the present study that HBV is still one of the major causes of chronic liver disease followed by HCV in India with more than one-third (27/80) of HCV patients, coinfected with HBV. The detection of HBsAg alone does not reflect the actual outcome of HBV infection and hence both HBsAg and anti-HBc IgG can help in identifying the true picture as was indicated in another study.[5]

References

1Liaw YT. Role of hepatitis C virus in dual and triple hepatitis virus infection. Hepatology 1995; 22 :1101-8.
2Sood A, Sidhu SS, Midha V, Jyoti D. High seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus and dual infection (hepatitis B and C virus) in non-alcoholic chronic liver disease in north India. J Assoc Physicians India 1999; 47 :205-8.
3Berry N, Chakravarti A, Das U, Kar P, Das BC, Mathur MD. HCV seroreactivty and detection of HCV RNA in cirrhotics. Diag Microbiol Infec Dis 1999; 35 :209-13.
4Singh V, Katyal R, Kochhar RK, Bhasin DK, Aggarwal RP. Study of hepatitis B and C Viral Markers in patients of Chronic Liver Disease. Indian J Med Microbiol 2004; 22 :269-70.
5Agarwal N, Naik S, Aggarwal R, Singh H, Somani SK, Kini D, et al . Occult hepatitis B virus infection as a cause of cirrhosis of liver in a region with intermediate endemicity. Indian J Gastroenterol 2003; 22 :127-31.