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Year : 2001  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 232-

Antibiotic resistance in pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from various clinical specimens - A retrospective study

M Mehta, JN Punia, RM Joshi 
 Department of Microbiology, GMCH, Chandigarh - 160 047, India

Correspondence Address:
M Mehta
Department of Microbiology, GMCH, Chandigarh - 160 047
India

How to cite this article:
Mehta M, Punia J N, Joshi R M. Antibiotic resistance in pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from various clinical specimens - A retrospective study.Indian J Med Microbiol 2001;19:232-232

How to cite this URL:
Mehta M, Punia J N, Joshi R M. Antibiotic resistance in pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from various clinical specimens - A retrospective study. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2001 [cited 2020 Jul 8 ];19:232-232
Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2001/19/4/232/8202

Full Text

Dear Editor,

This is the report of antibiogram of 381 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from blood, pus and body fluids of patients seeking treatment at Govt. Medical College & Hospital, Chandigarh from April 1997 to March, 1999. The isolates were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by standard procedures[1],[2] and their antibiogram was studied for amikacin, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin, gentamicin and ceftazidime.

The isolates were from pus (n=292,) blood (n=81) and body fluids (n=8) ; [Male: 227, Female: 154].Whereas resistance was found in 11%, 12% and 13.5% of blood isolates against amikacin, ciprofloxacin and piperacillin respectively, it was only 10% for each of these drugs from pus isolates. Resistance against gentamicin was encountered in 28% of pus and 30% of blood isolates. Resistance to ceftazidime was seen in 16% of pus and 20% of blood isolates. The number (n=8) of isolates from body fluids was too small to comment on.

Many antibiotics inhibit 'in vitro' growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but only a minority of these show useful activity at 'in vivo' therapeutic levels. A recent study on antimicrobial resistance among urinary isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Europe[3] showed best results for the carbapenems (susceptibility 89%), piperacillin (84%), and amikacin and ticarcillin (80% each). In another study 2.6%, 9.1%, 9.6%, 45.7% 39.9% and 51% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were found to be resistant to piperacillin, ceftazidime, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin respectively.[4] We, in our study, found amikacin, ciprofloxacin and piperacillin to be the most effective anti-pseudomonal agents.

References

1Mackie & McCartney. Practical Medical Microbiology, 14th Edition Churchill Livingstone Edinburg (1989), 491-504.
2Cowan & Steel. Manual for the identification of Medical Bacteria 3rd Edition. G I Barrow & Felthan R K A Cambridge Uni-Press; 1993: 113-116
3Fluit AC, Jones ME, Schmitz FJ, Acar J, Gupta R, Verhoef J. Antimicrobial resistance among urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates in Europe: results from the SENTRY ntimicrobial Surveillance Program 1997. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 2000; 77(2):147-152.
4Muller-Premru M, Gubina M. Serotype, antimicrobial susceptibility and clone distribution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a University hospital. Zentralblatt fur Bakteriologie 2000; 289(8): 857-867.