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Year : 2001  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 228--229

Prevalence of chlamydia trachomatis and neisseria gonorrhoeae genital infections in the apprently healthy population of Sringeri (Karnataka) by a coamplification PCR assay

B Sowmya, P Rajendran, S Krishnan, AG Joyee, R Hari, PK Rajesh, Ramkumar, SP Thyagarajan 
 Dr. ALM PGIBMS, Taramani, Chennai -600 113, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
P Rajendran
Dr. ALM PGIBMS, Taramani, Chennai -600 113, Tamil Nadu
India

How to cite this article:
Sowmya B, Rajendran P, Krishnan S, Joyee A G, Hari R, Rajesh P K, Ramkumar, Thyagarajan S P. Prevalence of chlamydia trachomatis and neisseria gonorrhoeae genital infections in the apprently healthy population of Sringeri (Karnataka) by a coamplification PCR assay.Indian J Med Microbiol 2001;19:228-229

How to cite this URL:
Sowmya B, Rajendran P, Krishnan S, Joyee A G, Hari R, Rajesh P K, Ramkumar, Thyagarajan S P. Prevalence of chlamydia trachomatis and neisseria gonorrhoeae genital infections in the apprently healthy population of Sringeri (Karnataka) by a coamplification PCR assay. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2001 [cited 2020 Jul 5 ];19:228-229
Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2001/19/4/228/8200

Full Text

Dear Editor,

Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the most common sexually transmitted pathogens in the developed world. An estimated 89 million new cases of genital chlamydial infection occurred in 1995 alone.[1] The actual prevalence in the Indian subcontinent is yet to be determined, although scanty information is available.

The biggest challenge to the control of chlamydial disease is that as many as 70 to 80% of the women and up to 50% of the men who are infected do not experience any symptoms. This results in a large reservoir of unrecognized, infected individuals who are capable of transmitting the infection to sexual partners.[2] Untreated infections in women can cause extensive inflammation and scarring of the female reproductive tract. In addition, studies prove that chlamydial infections may facilitate Human Immunodeficiency Virus transmission.[3]

Since 30-70% of all chlamydial infections may be asymptomatic, routine non-invasive screening of individuals at risk is highly desirable. The present study is aimed at screening of the apparently healthy population of Sringeri district (Karnataka), representing a sample of general population and to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic chlamydial infection in the community, which would be of great importance in revealing the baseline prevalence of this sexually transmitted disease and to undertake any further interventions for the prevention and management.

Four hundred and fifty first catch urine samples were collected from 264 women and 186 men of Sringeri between the age groups of 18 to 59 years by Multi Stage Cluster sampling method. The urine samples were processed at the site of collection and stored at -700C until tested.

The PCR tests were performed with Multiplex Amplicor CT/NG kit (Roche Diagnostic System). PCR positivity for Chlamydia trachomatis was observed in 4(0.88%) of the urine samples. Three women and one man were positive. Out of the 4 Chlamydia trachomatis PCR positive cases, 2 were in the age group of 18-28, one in 29-39 and one in 40-50. PCR was positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae in 5 out of 446 Chlamydia trachomatis PCR negative cases. Among the 4 Chlamydia trachomatis positive cases, one was found to be PCR positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae. However total N.gonorrhoeae positive cases were 6 (1.33%).

Two of the three women belonged to the age group of 18-28 years, which is the sexually active age. The association of C.trachomatis infectivity with the young age has been previously documented in many studies.[2]

This study gives comparatively a very low prevalence (0.88%), which might be attributed to a very small sample size or due to the sexual behavior prevalent in this particular community. The prevalence pattern worldwide among general population is found to be from 2-9%.[4],[5],[6],[7],[8],[9] Moreover the demographic and socio-economic factors needs to be further analyzed for the low prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis from this region of the country. A much higher sample size needs to be tested to determine the true prevalence rate in the apparently healthy population as this.

 Acknowledgement



This study was carried out in collaboration with 'Swasthya', an NGO organization from Sringeri mutt Dhanvantri Hospital.

References

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