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  Table of Contents  
CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 37  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 446-447
 

Group B Streptococcus vaginal colonisation in pregnant women at a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai


1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital and Medical Research Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Pediatrics, Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital and Medical Research Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Surya Hospitals, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
4 Department of Microbiology, Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital and Medical Research Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Date of Submission24-Nov-2019
Date of Decision04-Dec-2019
Date of Acceptance04-Dec-2019
Date of Web Publication29-Jan-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Tanu Singhal
Department of Pediatrics, Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital and Medical Research Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmm.IJMM_19_448

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How to cite this article:
Deshpande S, Singhal T, Pandit SN, Shah S. Group B Streptococcus vaginal colonisation in pregnant women at a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai. Indian J Med Microbiol 2019;37:446-7

How to cite this URL:
Deshpande S, Singhal T, Pandit SN, Shah S. Group B Streptococcus vaginal colonisation in pregnant women at a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Apr 9];37:446-7. Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2019/37/3/446/277073




Dear Editor,

Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is an important perinatal pathogen and a risk factor for preterm delivery. This study adds to currently available data about GBS colonisation rates in Indian women.

This prospective, observational study was conducted in pregnant women registered for delivery at the study centre, a tertiary care private hospital after obtaining clearance from the hospital ethics committee. A vaginal swab was collected between 35 and 37 weeks of gestation after informed consent and plated on 5% sheep's blood agar and incubated in 5% CO2. Identification of isolates and susceptibility were done by VITEK 2. A total of 208 women were enrolled in the study. 124 swabs (60%) were culture positive. GBS (Streptococcus agalactiae) was isolated in 22 women (10.5%); all isolates were universally susceptible to penicillin. [Figure 1] illustrates the distribution of the other study isolates.
Figure 1: Distribution and susceptibility of the study swabs (n = 208)

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A recent meta-analysis has summarised the average GBS colonisation rate in Indian women as 7.7% (range 7.2%–8.3%).[1] They further reported that rates were almost twice as high when enrichment broth was used (8.1% vs. 4.4%) and even higher when antigen detection methods (11.6%) and molecular methods (62%) were used. The pickup rates also increase if rectal swabs are used in addition to vaginal swabs.[2] Hence it is possible that in our study colonization rates were underreported since enrichment media were not used and rectal swabs not collected.

The burden of neonatal sepsis due to GBS is assumed to be low in India. However, a recent community-based study reported GBS as a cause of 1% of all cases of clinical neonatal sepsis akin to  Escherichia More Details coli (1%) and Klebsiella (1.5%).[3] GBS is also causally implicated as a cause of preterm births. Thus, the public health importance of GBS in India with the largest number of preterm births in the world is likely to be considerable.[4] While universal screening of pregnant women in India is unlikely to be cost-effective, there is need for evaluation of antibiotic prophylaxis on the basis of risk factors and selective screen for early-onset neonatal sepsis.[5]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
 ~ References Top

1.
Ashary N, Modi D. A Meta-Analysis for Association of Maternal Group B Streptococcus Colonization and Preterm Birth in Indian Population; 19 October, 2018. Available from: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3271425. [Last accessed on 2019 Nov 20].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Chaudhary M, Rench MA, Baker CJ, Singh P, Hans C, Edwards MS. Group B streptococcal colonization among pregnant women in Delhi, India. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2017;36:665-9.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Saha SK, Schrag SJ, El Arifeen S, Mullany LC, Shahidul Islam M, Shang N, et al. Causes and incidence of community-acquired serious infections among young children in South Asia (ANISA): An observational cohort study. Lancet 2018;392:145-59.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Narava S, Rajaram G, Ramadevi A, Prakash GV, Mackenzie S. Prevention of perinatal Group B streptococcal infections: A review with an Indian perspective. Indian J Med Microbiol 2014;32:6-12.  Back to cited text no. 4
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5.
Santhanam S, Jose R, Sahni RD, Thomas N, Beck MM. Prevalence of Group B Streptococcal colonization among pregnant women and neonates in a tertiary hospital in India. J Turk Ger Gynecol Assoc 2017;18:181-4.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


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