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Year : 2019  |  Volume : 37  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 91-94

Bad bug, no test: Tigecycline susceptibility testing challenges and way forward


Department of Clinical Microbiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Anushree Amladi
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore - 632 004, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmm.IJMM_19_207

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Tigecycline is a reserve antibiotic increasingly used for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacteria, especially Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. At present, there are concerns regarding the testing and interpretation of tigecycline susceptibility to bugs such as K. pneumoniae and A. baumannii, which limit clinicians in appropriate usage. Use of appropriate method for testing such as broth microdilution is essential. In addition, tigecycline susceptibility testing is a challenge due to inconsistent results from various antimicrobial susceptibility testing automated platforms. There is a great need to define a suitable methodology along with interpretive criteria, especially for K. pneumoniae and A. baumannii. The European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) breakpoints show wide variation and are defined for different set of organisms. Non-species-related pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) breakpoints defined by the EUCAST can be used for organisms such as K. pneumoniae and A. baumannii.






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