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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 36  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 136-139

A first-line antiretroviral therapy-resistant HIV patient with rhinoentomophthoromycosis


1 Department of Dermatology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College and General Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Medical Microbiology, Sepsis Research Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Rajendra J Kothavade
Department of Medical Microbiology, Sepsis Research Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Canada
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmm.IJMM_16_330

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The Conidiobolus coronatus-related rhinoentomophthoromycosis in immunocompetent and immunocompromised (HIV negative) individuals has been treated successfully with antifungal drugs. However, C. coronatus infections in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART)-resistant (HIV infected) individuals particularly with rhinoentomophthoromycosis have not been reported previously. Here, we describe a case of itraconazole non-responding rhinoentomophthoromycosis in an HIV-infected patient with first-line antiretroviral (ART) drug resistance which was successfully managed through systematic diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in dermatologic setting. A 32-year-old HIV-1-infected man presented with painless swelling, nasal redness and respiratory difficulty. The patient was receiving first-line ART and had a history of traumatic injury before the onset of nasopharyngeal manifestations. The patient's previous history included oral candidiasis and pulmonary tuberculosis.






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2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
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