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Year : 2017  |  Volume : 35  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 607-609

Demographic profile of healthy children with nasopharyngeal colonisation of Streptococcus pneumoniae: A research paper


1 Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, CHILDS Trust Medical Research Foundation, Kanchi Kamkoti CHILDS Trust Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Pediatric Medicine, CHILDS Trust Medical Research Foundation, Kanchi Kamkoti CHILDS Trust Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Department of Microbiology and Laboratory Services, CHILDS Trust Medical Research Foundation, Kanchi Kamkoti CHILDS Trust Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
4 Department of Microbiology and Laboratory Services, Sundaram Medical Foundation, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Radhika Raman
Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, CHILDS Trust Medical Research Foundation, Kanchi Kamkoti CHILDS Trust Hospital, Nungambakkam, Chennai - 600 034, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmm.IJMM_15_347

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Background: Pneumonia is a preventable cause of mortality in children. Streptococcus pneumoniae colonising the nasopharynx of healthy children can cause invasive diseases and the serotype distribution of colonisation isolates should be an indicator of invasive disease, antibiotic resistance profiles, and potential vaccine coverage. Identifying factors influencing nasopharyngeal colonisation, the serotypes and antimicrobial resistance pattern can improve rational preventive strategies. Objectives: Identify risk factors associated with nasopharyngeal colonisation of S.pneumoniae in healthy children between 6 months to 5 years of age. Determine the serotype and antibiotic sensitivity of S. pneumoniae isolated from nasopharynx of healthy children. Methods: This prospective observational included 500 healthy children, 6months to 5 years of age. Demographic features of the study population, the serotypes and antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of S.Pneumoniae isolated from cultures of nasopharyngeal swabs were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: S. pneumoniae was isolated in 9% of 450 children. Increased nasopharyngeal carriage rate was associated with overcrowding 48.8% and poor ventilation 35.5%. 6B (n=16) was the most common serotype isolated. 69% were serogroups known to cause invasive disease All S. pneumoniae isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid. Antimicrobial susceptibility of PCV 7 serotypes were greater than non PCV 7 serotypes for almost all antimicrobials tested. Penicillin resistance was 11 % and MDR 51%






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2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
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