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Year : 2017  |  Volume : 35  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 593-596

Melioidosis: Reinfection going incognito as relapse


Department of Microbiology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Chiranjay Mukhopadhyay
Department of Microbiology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal - 576 104, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmm.IJMM_17_140

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Melioidosis has recently gained importance as an emerging disease in India. Recurrent melioidosis has been reported from different parts of the world and can be due to relapse or reinfection. Distinction between relapse and reinfection is important for epidemiology, investigation and management. Here, we present the data regarding rate of recurrence and utility of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) in differentiating relapse form reinfection amongst melioidosis patients from a tertiary care hospital in South India. Amongst the 31 patients who survived and underwent follow-up, 4 (13%) presented with recurrence. Three cases (75%) were identified as reinfection and one (25%) as relapse based on MLST. Re-exposure to environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei amongst patients with melioidosis in endemic areas is likely. In such a scenario, more often than not, recurrence of melioidosis can be attributed to reinfection.






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2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
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