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Year : 2016  |  Volume : 34  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 350-352

Distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci


Department of Microbiology, Dr. ALM PG Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, Chennai, India

Correspondence Address:
P Krishnan
Department of Microbiology, Dr. ALM PG Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, Chennai
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.188339

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The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS). Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The presence of SCCmec types and AME genes, namely, aac (6')-Ie-aph (2''), aph (3')-IIIa and ant (4')-Ia was determined using two different multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The most encountered AME genes were aac (6′)-Ie-aph (2'') (55.4%) followed by aph (3')-IIIa (32.3%) and ant (4')-Ia gene (9%). SCCmec type I (34%) was predominant in this study. In conclusion, the aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') was the most common AME gene and SCCmec type I was most predominant among the MRS isolates.






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