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CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 34  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 258-259
 

Needle-stick injury among health care workers and its response in a tertiary care hospital


Department of Microbiology, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital and PGIMER, New Delhi, India

Date of Submission03-Nov-2014
Date of Acceptance05-May-2015
Date of Web Publication14-Apr-2016

Correspondence Address:
S Malhotra
Department of Microbiology, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital and PGIMER, New Delhi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.180368

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How to cite this article:
Malhotra S, Sharma S, Bhatia N, Hans C. Needle-stick injury among health care workers and its response in a tertiary care hospital. Indian J Med Microbiol 2016;34:258-9

How to cite this URL:
Malhotra S, Sharma S, Bhatia N, Hans C. Needle-stick injury among health care workers and its response in a tertiary care hospital. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Oct 18];34:258-9. Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2016/34/2/258/180368


Dear Editor,

Needle-stick injuries (NSIs) are a potentially serious threat to health care workers (HCW) due to high risk of transmission of blood-borne pathogens such as HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). We aimed to find the incidence of NSIs amongst different categories of HCWs in our hospital along with associated risk factors for the same. HCWs, who reported to ICTC from January 2011 to December 2013, were included in the study, and a detailed proforma for NSI was filled for each individual. After taking informed consent, all exposed HCWs and source patients were screened for HIV, HBV and HCV infections by rapid screening tests. The HCW were referred to ART centre, and further management was given by ART in-charge. [1]

Out of 312 self-reported cases of NSI, 51% (159) were males and 49% (153) were females and 82% (256) of the HCW were between age group of 20-30 years followed by 11.5% (36) of HCW in the age group of 30-40 years. Interns (90) had the highest percentage (28.8%) of NSI, followed by junior residents (64 i.e. 20.5%), post-graduate students (61 i.e. 19.5%) and nursing staff (53 i.e. 17%). Collection of patients sample for various investigations are usually done by interns or the junior residents who are mostly between the age group of 20-30 years in our hospital hence needle handling is more common in them. Most common mode of injury was during the collection of blood samples (24%) [Table 1]. All HCWs were HIV non-reactive. Among the source patients, 38 were HIV-1antibody positive and the exposed HCW from HIV positive patients were started on post-exposure prophylaxis, 18 were given basic regimen (2 drugs - 2 NRTIs) while 20 HCW were given expanded regimen (3 drugs - 2 NRTIs and 1 PI) based on the status of source and exposure code. Ninety eight HCW reported for follow-up testing after 6 weeks, 217 reported after 3 months while 149 reported after 6 months of injury, and all were found to be HIV non-reactive.
Table 1: Procedures during which needle - stick injury occurred

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This study suggests the need for regular education programme of interns and residents regarding the prevention of NSI, universal precautions and post-exposure measures. In our hospital, there is a protocol that after joining the hospital, all HCWs need to attend the lecture on Infection control and biomedical waste management which also includes NSI prevention and management and mandatory hepatitis B vaccination of HCWs. During sample collection, wearing gloves, use of auto-disabled syringes, no recapping of needles and vacutainers are strictly enforced as safe infection control practices.


 ~ Acknowledgement Top


The authors gratefully acknowledge the National AIDS Control Organization for providing HIV test kits and the guidelines laid down to conduct such tests and all the staff of ICTC, Department of Microbiology for their support and contribution.

 
 ~ References Top

1.
National AIDS Control Organisation. Antiretroviral Therapy Guidelines for HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents Including Post-exposure Prophylaxis. Ministry of Health and Family Welfare; 2007.  Back to cited text no. 1
    



 
 
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