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CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 34  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 118
 

Blood stream infection by Chryseobacterium species in an immunocompetent individual


Department of Microbiology, Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India

Date of Submission22-Aug-2014
Date of Acceptance06-May-2015
Date of Web Publication15-Jan-2016

Correspondence Address:
P Sharma
Department of Microbiology, Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.167678

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How to cite this article:
Sharma P, Gupta S, Verma S, Singh D V, Kanga A. Blood stream infection by Chryseobacterium species in an immunocompetent individual. Indian J Med Microbiol 2016;34:118

How to cite this URL:
Sharma P, Gupta S, Verma S, Singh D V, Kanga A. Blood stream infection by Chryseobacterium species in an immunocompetent individual. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Sep 23];34:118. Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2016/34/1/118/167678


Dear Editor,

The article by Deepa et al.[1] entitled 'Myroides odoratus and Chryseobacterium indologenes: Two rare isolates in the immunocompromised' was very informative. We would like to share our experience on the Chryseobacterium spp. isolated in our clinical microbiology laboratory from blood culture.

A 55-year-old man was admitted with complaints of high-grade fever and pain abdomen for 2 days and was apparently immunocompetent. On computed tomography imagining, he was diagnosed with mucocele of gallbladder. Blood culture examination was sterile. Patient was managed conservatively, and piperacillin-tazobactam was continued for 7 days. After 3 weeks, he again developed fever. Blood culture repeated which revealed yellow colonies on blood agar but no growth on MacConkey agar (MA). Examination, imagining and repeat blood culture were done after taking informed consent. Bacteria were filamentous, Gram-negative, size 5–7 µm × 0.5 µm, non-sporing, arranged singly. The organism was identified using standard methods of identification.[2] The pigment of flexirubin type was demonstrated by colour change from yellow to red by adding 10% KOH solution.[3]

Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) done by Kirby–Bauer disc diffusion method and interpreted by CLSI guidelines for non-Enterobacteriaceae. It was susceptible to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, azithromycin, gentamicin, amikacin, tobramycin, piperacillin-tazobactam, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, aztreonam, imipenem, meropenem. Patient improved on azithromycin. Our isolate was dissimilar from previous reports by being sensitive to most antibiotics.[4]

Chryseobacterium is not a human commensal, and its infections are ill-defined due to the rare recovery from clinical samples.[1] It is frequently discarded as contaminanting Gram-positive cocci if the smear is not performed as they fail to grow on MA. It is an important pathogen which requires accurate identification and AST testing.

 
 ~ References Top

1.
Deepa R, Venkatesh KG, Parveen JD, Banu ST, Jayalakshmi G. Myroides odoratus and Chryseobacterium indologenes: Two rare isolates in the immunocompromised. Indian J Med Microbiol 2014;32:327-30.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
2.
Schrechenberger P, Daneshvar MI, Hollis DG. Acinetobacter, Chryseobacterium, Moraxella, and other non-fermentative Gram-negative bacteria. In: Murray PR, Baron EJ, Jorgensen JH, Landry ML, Pfaller MA, editors. Manual of Cinical Microbilogy. 9th ed., Ch. 50. Washington DC: ASM Press; 2007. p. 770-802.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Christakis GB, Perlorentzou SP, Chalkiopoulou I, Athanasiou A, Legakis NJ. Chryseobacterium indologenes non-catheter-related bacteremia in a patient with a solid tumor. J Clin Microbiol 2005;43:2021-3.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Bhuyar G, Jain S, Shah H, Mehta VK. Urinary tract infection by Chryseobacterium indologenes. Indian J Med Microbiol 2012;30:370-2.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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