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  Table of Contents  
CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 464-465
 

In vitro activity of ceftaroline against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates


Department of Microbiology, Sri Venkata Sai Medical College, Mahabubnagar, Telangana, India

Date of Submission19-Jun-2014
Date of Acceptance20-Jan-2015
Date of Web Publication12-Jun-2015

Correspondence Address:
V Kabra
Department of Microbiology, Sri Venkata Sai Medical College, Mahabubnagar, Telangana
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.158612

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How to cite this article:
Basireddy S, Singh M, Ali S, Kabra V. In vitro activity of ceftaroline against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Indian J Med Microbiol 2015;33:464-5

How to cite this URL:
Basireddy S, Singh M, Ali S, Kabra V. In vitro activity of ceftaroline against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Aug 20];33:464-5. Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2015/33/3/464/158612


Dear Editor,

Ceftaroline, an advanced generation cephalosporin antibiotic, widely described in the literature as fifth generation cephalosporin, has been recently approved for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. [1],[2] This is the first cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRSA). This antibiotic differs from other cephalosporin group of antibiotics in possessing high affinity for PBP2a protein, which mediates resistance to all the β lactam antibiotics in MRSA.

As ceftaroline is a newer agent with only limited knowledge about its resistance surveillance, the present study was designed to know the susceptibility patterns of MRSA against this agent.

A total of 50 non-duplicate methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from various clinical samples were included in the study. Methicillin resistance was detected by using cefoxitin 30-μg disc. Ceftaroline minimum inhibitory concentrations were detected for all these 50 isolates by using the E strips of ceftaroline (biomerieux). The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) clinical break points were applied for interpretation of ceftaroline MIC (sensitive ≤ 1 mg/L, 2 mg/L intermediate, resistant ≥4 mg/L). [3] S. aureus ATCC 29213 was used as control strain for MIC detection.

All the 50 MRSA isolates tested against ceftaroline were sensitive to this antibiotic. Ceftaroline MIC values ranged from 0.125 to 1.5 mg/L. Only two isolates showed the maximum MIC of 1.5 mg/L, which is in the intermediate susceptible range. And all the remaining isolates showed MIC 1 mg/L. The MIC50 and the MIC90 of the isolates were 0.5 mg/L and 1 mg/L, respectively.

In our study, all the MRSA isolates have shown uniform susceptibility to this drug with the MIC90 ≤ 1 mg/L [Figure 1]. Our findings correlate well with the surveillance studies of other geographical areas. In the Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance Evaluation (AWARE) [4] programme, 98.4% of the MRSA were inhibited at MIC value of 1 mg/L. The highest MIC in their study was 2 mg/L. In a study by Jones et al., [5] 94.8% of the MRSA isolates from USA were inhibited at a concentration of 1 mg/L, whereas only 82.6% European isolates were inhibited at 1 mg/L and 99.5% isolates at 2 mg/L.
Figure 1: MIC90 - 1mg/L

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To conclude, ceftaroline showed good in vitro activity against MRSA isolates and can be considered as an effective alternative for the treatment of these infections.

 
 ~ References Top

1.
Kollef MH. New antimicrobial agents for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Crit Care Resusc 2009;11:282-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Culos KA, Cannon JP, Grim SA. Alternative agents to vancomycin for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections. Am J Ther 2013;20:200-12.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing: Twenty-third Informational Supplment M100-S23. 2013;72-86.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Flamm RK, Saer HS, Farrell DJ, Jones RN. Summary of ceftaroline activity against pathogens in the United States, 2010: Report from the Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance Evaluation (AWARE) Surveillance Program. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2012;56:2933-40.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Jones RN, Mendes RE, Sader HS. Ceftaroline activity against pathogens associated with complicated skin and skin structure infections: Results from an international surveillance study. J Antimicrob Chemother 2010;65:iv17-31.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


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