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  Table of Contents  
CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 458-459
 

Higher incidence of dengue in Theni district, South India


Department of Microbiology, Government Theni Medical College, Theni, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission23-May-2014
Date of Acceptance11-Dec-2014
Date of Web Publication12-Jun-2015

Correspondence Address:
R Sekar
Department of Microbiology, Government Theni Medical College, Theni, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.158605

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How to cite this article:
Amudhan M, Sekar R, Sivashankar M, Raja G A, Ganesan S, Mythreyee M. Higher incidence of dengue in Theni district, South India. Indian J Med Microbiol 2015;33:458-9

How to cite this URL:
Amudhan M, Sekar R, Sivashankar M, Raja G A, Ganesan S, Mythreyee M. Higher incidence of dengue in Theni district, South India. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Nov 18];33:458-9. Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2015/33/3/458/158605


Dear Editor,

Dengue is an important arboviral disease caused by dengue virus, and is transmitted to humans by Aedes mosquito's. [1] According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimation, the annual incidence of dengue infection is 50 million. [2] However, a recent report estimated about 390 million dengue cases per year across the globe. [3] Hence, it is important to measure the actual burden of the disease in all regions. Therefore, herewith we report the incidence of dengue infection encountered in Theni district, located in rural part of south India.

The present study include, clinically suspected cases of dengue fever referred from our hospital and different primary health centres (PHCs) located in our district during the period from January 2010 to December 2013. The patients manifesting fever with or without hemorrhage were suspected to have dengue fever and are referred to our laboratory by clinicians. The dengue infection was diagnosed by IgM capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, National Institute of Virology, Pune, India). [4]

During the study period we have enrolled a total of 4578 dengue suspected patients in our laboratory. Among them 1185 (25.9%) were found to have dengue specific IgM in their serum sample. Intriguingly, until April 2012, the monthly incidence of dengue was observed to be 0.4 ± 1.26 (mean ± standard deviation [SD]), but in May 2012, the incidence has significantly increased (> mean + 2SD; Incidence - 5.7/lakh population). Although, the outbreak was initially controlled, it re-emerged more intensively in October 2012, suggesting the failure of control measures [Figure 1]. Since then, the incidence has sharply increased and reached the peak in January 2013, subsequently the incidence trend gradually declined. The dengue cases documented in Theni district, constitute about 13% (777/6122) of the total dengue cases documented in the state of Tamil Nadu, which comprises very high proportion when compared with other districts. [5]
Figure 1: Monthly incidence of Dengue in Theni district, Tamil Nadu

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Therefore, it is certainly evident that the incidence of dengue in Theni district is very high when compared with other regions and it necessitates timely preventive measures for the forthcoming monsoon season.

 
 ~ References Top

1.
Martina BE, Koraka P, Osterhaus AD. Dengue virus pathogenesis: An integrated view. Clin Microbiol Rev 2009;22:564-81.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
WHO. Dengue: guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, prevention and control. World Health Organization 2009. Available from: http://www.who.int/tdr/publications/documents/dengue-diagnosis.pdf. [Last accessed on 2015 Jan 06].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Bhatt S, Gething PW, Brady OJ, Messina JP, Farlow AW, Moyes CL, et al. The global distribution and burden of dengue. Nature 2013;496:504-7.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
NVBDCP. Guidelines for clinical management of dengue fever, dengue haemorragic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Directorate of National Vector Borne Diseaes Control Programme, Directorate of General Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare 2008: Available from: http://nvbdcp.gov.in/doc/clinical%20guidelines.pdf [Last accessed on 2014 Oct 27].  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
NVBDCP. Dengue Cases and Deaths in the Country since 2007. Directorate General of Health Services, National Vector Borne Diseaes Control Programme, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare 2014: Available from: http://nvbdcp.gov.in/den-cd.html [Last accessed on 2014 Oct 27].  Back to cited text no. 5
    


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