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  Table of Contents  
CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 328-329
 

Cases of "Measles" in adult age group of St. John's Medical College Boy's Hostel, Bangalore, South India


National Institute of Virology, Bangalore Unit, Dharma Ram College Post, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Date of Submission26-May-2014
Date of Acceptance29-May-2014
Date of Web Publication10-Apr-2015

Correspondence Address:
C G Raut
National Institute of Virology, Bangalore Unit, Dharma Ram College Post, Bangalore, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.153574

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How to cite this article:
Sinha D P, Raut C G, Shaikh N J, Jayaprakash H, Manjunatha M J, Hanumiah H. Cases of "Measles" in adult age group of St. John's Medical College Boy's Hostel, Bangalore, South India. Indian J Med Microbiol 2015;33:328-9

How to cite this URL:
Sinha D P, Raut C G, Shaikh N J, Jayaprakash H, Manjunatha M J, Hanumiah H. Cases of "Measles" in adult age group of St. John's Medical College Boy's Hostel, Bangalore, South India. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Aug 22];33:328-9. Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2015/33/2/328/153574


Dear Editor,

In the months of November to December 2013, we investigated measles suspected cases under St. John's Medical College Boy's Hostel, Bangalore (SJMCBHB) of the Karnataka state. On 1 st week of November 2013, a Disease Surveillance Officer reported suspected measles cases in the SJMCBHB which is situated in the centre of city. The objectives of confirming the diagnosis of disease and recommendations for their prevention and control is provided.

Based on the initial report of first case with fever, cough, coryza, conjuctivitis and rash meeting the clinical description of suspected measles from the SJMCBHB. Urine and blood samples were collected from all the cases. A total 16 samples of eight cases were taken for diagnosis of measles virus. Since the cases were adults, the recorded immunisation programme was not available. Measles serological results showed out of eight adults two were positive for measles IgM antibodies tested by MAC-ELISA. Urine samples were taken for detecting the measles virus by RT-PCR. [1],[2]

Two urine cases were positive for measles-specific RT-PCR and sequencing results. Measles sequencing results of two urine measles-positive samples sequence identity revealed that the "D8 genotype" matching with the Measles virus genotype D8 strain (Genbank acc. KF015992).

According to case data, the age-group affected with this outbreak was 17-27 years. Five were males and the rest three were females. There was no history of travel outside the city or villages in the preceding month by all the affected adults. A report of measles among health care researchers has been documented in the literature. [3] Measles continues to be leading cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in developing countries over 40 years. [4]

We identified four confirmed cases of measles in the Urban Medical College hostel of Karnataka state, India. Similarly, cases among the higher age group point to an increase in vaccine failure. There is no structured immunisation programme per se during that period in that area. No outbreaks were reported among children in that duration. This study suggests that the improving vaccine coverage needs to be addressed for children as well as adults.


 ~ Acknowledgement for Financial Support Top


We are thankful to D. T. Mourya for providing funds and valuable suggestions during different stages of this study.

 
 ~ References Top

1.
Rota PA, Liffick SL, Rota JS, Katz RS, Redd S, Papania M, et al. Molecular epidemiology of measles viruses in the United States, 1997-2001. Emerg Infect Dis 2002;8:902-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Manual for the laboratory diagnosis of measles and rubella virus infection. 2 nd ed. Available from: WHO/IVB/07.01 [Last accessed on 2014 May 01].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Rota JS, Hickman CJ, Sowers SB, Rota PA, Mercader S, Bellini WJ. Two case studies of modified measles in vaccinated physicians exposed to primary measles cases: High risk of infection but low risk of transmission. J Infect Dis 2011;204 Suppl 1:S559-63.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
World Health Organization. Global measles and rubella laboratory network--update. Wkly Epidemiol Rec 2005;44:384-8.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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