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  Table of Contents  
CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 32  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 459-460
 

Production of neuraminidase in relation with biofilm formation among clinical and healthy skin isolates of Acinetobacter species


1 Department of Microbiology, Dr. Arcot Lakshmanaswami Mudaliar Post Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, Taramani, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Clinical Microbiology, Madras Medical Mission, Mogappair, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission30-Sep-2013
Date of Acceptance06-Feb-2014
Date of Web Publication4-Oct-2014

Correspondence Address:
S Srivani Ramesh
Department of Microbiology, Dr. Arcot Lakshmanaswami Mudaliar Post Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, Taramani, Chennai, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.142235

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How to cite this article:
Prakasam G, Rohit A, Padmasini E, Ramesh S S. Production of neuraminidase in relation with biofilm formation among clinical and healthy skin isolates of Acinetobacter species . Indian J Med Microbiol 2014;32:459-60

How to cite this URL:
Prakasam G, Rohit A, Padmasini E, Ramesh S S. Production of neuraminidase in relation with biofilm formation among clinical and healthy skin isolates of Acinetobacter species . Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2014 [cited 2019 Sep 19];32:459-60. Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2014/32/4/459/142235


Dear Editor,

Acinetobacter
species has emerged as one of the most troublesome pathogen in healthcare facilities globally. They often colonise the skin and upper respiratory tract of hospitalised patients, which enables a wide spectrum of infections, including ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, etc. [1] Acinetobacter spp are the only Gram-negative non-fermenting bacteria which reside as a normal commensal in human. [2] Other than Acinetobacter baumannii, other species of this genera are gaining much importance as they are frequently encountered in different clinical conditions. [3] Certain bacteria are known to produce neuraminidase (sialidase) which discharges terminal sialic acids from glycoproteins, glycolipids and gangliosides found on the host cells. [4] The ability of neuraminidase produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to act as an important marker for conferring virulent trait. Cacalano et al., in 1992 stated that, neuraminidase plays an essential role in bacterial attachment followed by invasion into host cells. [5] After attachment the organism may form biofilm for subsequent colonisation. Data regarding neuraminidase production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa have already been well established. So far to the best of our knowledge there is only one report of neuraminidase-producing Acinetobacter spp [6] and there is a paucity of information on virulence factors produced by Acinetobacter spp. Hence, we have investigated the neuraminidase production by Acinetobacter spp. We tested a total of 108 clinical isolates of A. baumannii from different clinical samples and 28 skin isolates (24 A. lwoffii and 4 A. junii) from healthy individuals. One hundred and eight A. baumannii clinical isolates includes, 38 endotracheal aspirates, 20 blood, 15 pus, 10 urine, 8 sputum, 5 bronchoalveolar lavage, 5 wound swabs, 3 oropharyngeal aspirates, 2 nasopharyngeal aspirates, one of each from diabetic foot ulcer and central vein tip. We have also included a known neuraminidase-positive P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain in this study. All isolates were tested for neuraminidase production by sensitive fluorometric assay using 2'-(4-methylumbelliferyl)α-D-N acetylneuraminic acid (Sigma-Aldrich, USA) as substrate. [7] 47/108 (43.5%) isolates of A. baumannii from clinical specimens were found to produce neuraminidase, only 8 (28.5%) isolates (5 A. lwoffii and 3 A. junii) were producing neuraminidase from 28 (24 A. lwoffii and 4 A. junii) isolates of skin of healthy individuals. Similarly study conducted by Sugita et al. in 2000 documented that 2-3% of Acinetobacter spp were found to have neuraminidase activity. [6] Further, these isolates were also tested for biofilm production by tissue culture plate method. [8] Among neuraminidase-positive isolates, 19/47 (40.4%) clinical isolates of A. baumannii and 3/8 (37.5%) skin isolates were shown to form biofilm. Whereas, 12/61 (19.6%) and 6/20 (30%) of neuraminidase negative clinical isolates of A. baumannii and skin isolates from healthy individuals, respectively, were found to exhibit biofilm. Neuraminidase producing these bacteria can convert sialyated to asialyated glycolipids on the mucosal surfaces, facilitating the attachment of such bacteria on to the host cells followed by colonisation. [4] 40.4% of neuraminidase-positive A. baumannii clinical isolates and 37.5% of skin neuraminidase-positive isolates were biofilm producers. We concluded that neuraminidase enzyme can also be one of the contributing virulent factor of Acinetobacter spp for the attachment towards various surfaces. Further study involving with molecular mechanism of neuraminidase exhibited by Acinetobacter spp may throw more light on this virulence trait to know the actual pathogenesis of the outrageous pathogen. This is the first and preliminary study conducted on this factor in Indian context.

 
 ~ References Top

1.Peleg AY, Seifert H, Paterson DV. Acinetobacter baumannii: Emergence of a successful pathogen. Clin Microbiol Rev 2008;21:538-82.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Patil JR, Jog NR, Chopade BA. Isolation and characterization of Acinetobacter species from upper respiratory tract of healthy humans and demonstration of lectin activity. Indian J Med Microbiol 2001;19:30-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Patil JR, Chopade BA. Distribution and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter species on the skin of healthy humans. Natl Med J India 2001;14:204-8.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Soong G, Muir A, Gomez MI, Waks J, Reddy B, Planet P, et al. Bacterial neuraminidase facilitates mucosal infection by participating in biofilm production. J Clin Invest 2006;116:2297-305.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.Cacalano G, Kays M, Saiman L, Prince A. Production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa neuraminidase is increased under hyper osmolar conditions and is regulated by genes involved in alginate expression. J Clin Invest 1992;89:1866-74.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.Sugita H, Shinagawa Y, Okano R. Neuraminidase producing ability of intestinal bacteria isolated from coastal fish. Lett Appl Microbiol 2000;31:10-3.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.Ghazei C, Ahmadi M, Jazani NH. Detection of neuraminidase activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Iran J Basic Med Sci 2010;13:69-5.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.T, Singhal S, Khan S, Upadhyay DJ, Fatma T, Rattan A. Detection of biofilm formation among the clinical isolates of Staphylococci: An evaluation of three different screening methods. Indian J Med Microbiol 2006;24:25-9.  Back to cited text no. 8
    




 

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