Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology IAMM  | About us |  Subscription |  e-Alerts  | Feedback |  Login   
  Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 Home | Ahead of Print | Current Issue | Archives | Search | Instructions  
Users Online: 334 Official Publication of Indian Association of Medical Microbiologists 
 ~   Next article
 ~   Previous article
 ~   Table of Contents

 ~   Similar in PUBMED
 ~  Search Pubmed for
 ~  Search in Google Scholar for
 ~Related articles
 ~   Citation Manager
 ~   Access Statistics
 ~   Reader Comments
 ~   Email Alert *
 ~   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed8335    
    Printed177    
    Emailed3    
    PDF Downloaded639    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 349-353

Genotypes of hepatitis C virus in the Indian sub-continent: A decade-long experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India


Department of Clinical Virology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
P Abraham
Department of Clinical Virology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.118875

Rights and Permissions

Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic liver disease (CLD) that can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Genotypes of HCV can vary in pathogenicity and can impact on treatment outcome. Objectives: To study the different genotypes among patients with HCV related CLD attending a tertiary care hospital in south India during 2002-2012. Study Design: Study subjects were those referred to clinical virology from the liver clinic. Genotyping was performed using the genotype specific core primers in nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 5′ non-coding regions based PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism and NS5B sequencing methods. With the latter method, obtained sequences were compared with published GenBank sequences to determine the genotype. Results: Of the 451 samples tested, HCV genotype 3 was found to be the most predominant (63.85%). Other genotypes detected were genotype 1 (25.72%), genotype 2 (0.002%), genotype 4 (7.5%) and genotype 6 (2.7%). Genotype 3 was the common genotype in patients from Eastern India while genotype 1 and 4 were mainly seen in South Indian patients. Genotype 6 was seen exclusively in patients from North-Eastern India. Two other patients were infected with recombinants of genotype 1 and 2. Conclusions: In this study spanning a decade, HCV genotype 3 and genotype 1 were found to be the predominant genotypes in the Indian sub-continent. Genotype 4 and genotype 6 appeared to show some geographic restriction. A continued monitoring of HCV genotypes is essential for the optimum management of these chronically infected patients. In addition, knowledge of circulating genotypes could impact on future vaccine formulations.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow

Online since April 2001, new site since 1st August '04