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 BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 212-214

Detection of bacterial growth in blood components using oxygen consumption as a surrogate marker in a tertiary oncology setup


1 Laboratory Manager, ACTREC, Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai 410 210
2 Composite Lab, ACTREC, Department of Microbiology, ACTREC, Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai 410 210
3 Transfusion Medicine, ACTREC, Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai 410 210
4 Blood Bank Officer, ACTREC, Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai 410 210

Correspondence Address:
V G Bhat
Composite Lab, ACTREC, Department of Microbiology, ACTREC, Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai 410 210

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.96695

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Microbiological contamination of blood and blood products is a well-recognised transfusion risk. This study was performed in the blood bank of our oncology centre, with an objective to detect bacterial contamination in our blood products using oxygen consumption as a surrogate marker [Pall Enhanced Bacterial Detection System (eBDS)]. Results revealed that the percentages of failed units were 1.16% for random donor platelets (RDP), 0.81% for single donor platelets (SDP) and 2.94% for packed red blood cells (PRBCs), of which one RDP and one SDP grew coagulase-negative staphylococcus, while one PRBC culture grew Gram-positive bacilli.






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2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
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