Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology IAMM  | About us |  Subscription |  e-Alerts  | Feedback |  Login   
  Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 Home | Ahead of Print | Current Issue | Archives | Search | Instructions  
Users Online: 991 Official Publication of Indian Association of Medical Microbiologists 
 ~   Next article
 ~   Previous article
 ~   Table of Contents

 ~   Similar in PUBMED
 ~  Search Pubmed for
 ~  Search in Google Scholar for
 ~Related articles
 ~   Citation Manager
 ~   Access Statistics
 ~   Reader Comments
 ~   Email Alert *
 ~   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2778    
    Printed122    
    Emailed6    
    PDF Downloaded239    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 

 BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 198-202

Does antimicrobial use increase the rate of antimicrobial resistance? A one year experience


Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Ministry of Health Okmeydani Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
H Gedik
Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Ministry of Health Okmeydani Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul
Turkey
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.96692

Rights and Permissions

Antimicrobial resistance has been a challenge in all countries. The aim of this study is to ascertain the risk factors that predispose patients to infections with extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL)-producing gram-negative bacteria and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Patients who were treated in the secondary care hospital due to infections in 2009 and their isolates were evaluated retrospectively. In total, 174 patients and their 189 isolates, which contained 36 ESBL-producing gram-negative bacteria, 112 non-ESBL-producing gram-negative bacteria, and 41 gram-positive bacteria were evaluated retrospectively. Hospitalisation in the previous 3 months, comorbidity, and usage of amoxicillin-clavulanate in the previous 3 months were determined to be the risk factors associated with infections by the ESBL-producing gram-negative bacteria. Hospitalisation was found to be a risk factor for infection with MRSA. Hospitalisation and underlying conditions increase the colonisation with resistant bacteria and resistance rates in the patients, hospitals and communities. An infection control programme should be contemplated not only for hospitals, but also for the greater community.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow

Online since April 2001, new site since 1st August '04