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Year : 2011  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 169-171

Central venous catheter-related blood stream infection rate in critical care units in a tertiary care, teaching hospital in Mumbai


Department of Microbiology, Grant Medical College and Sir J.J. Hospital, Mumbai - 400 008, India

Correspondence Address:
C Chande
Department of Microbiology, Grant Medical College and Sir J.J. Hospital, Mumbai - 400 008
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.81796

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Blood stream infections related to central venous catheterization are one of the major device-associated infections reported. Patients admitted in critical care units requiring central venous catheterization and presenting with signs of septicemia during catheterization period were investigated for catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI). The CRBSI rate was 9.26 per 1000 catheter days in general with highest rate in neonatal intensive care unit (27.02/1000 days). Site of insertion of catheter and duration of catheterization did not show the influence on the CRBSI rate. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci were the predominant cause. Mortality of 33% was observed in patients with CRBSI. Since central venous catheters are increasingly being used in the critical care, regular surveillance for infection associated them are essential.






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2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
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