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 SPECIAL ARTICLE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 277-280

Hospital antibiogram: A necessity


Department of Microbiology, Manipal Hospital, 98 Rustom Bagh, HAL Airport Road, Bangalore - 560 017, India

Correspondence Address:
S Joshi
Department of Microbiology, Manipal Hospital, 98 Rustom Bagh, HAL Airport Road, Bangalore - 560 017
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.71802

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The hospital antibiogram is a periodic summary of antimicrobial susceptibilities of local bacterial isolates submitted to the hospital's clinical microbiology laboratory. Antibiograms are often used by clinicians to assess local susceptibility rates, as an aid in selecting empiric antibiotic therapy, and in monitoring resistance trends over time within an institution. Antibiograms can also used to compare susceptibility rates across institutions and track resistance trends. Some hospitals have adequate support from the computer department to be able to extract data from their reporting module. The WHONET software can be freely downloaded and used for analysis. Consensus guidelines have been developed by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) to standardise methods used in constructing antibiograms. These guidelines can be incorporated into the WHONET software for analysis. Only the first isolate from the patient is to be included in the analysis. The analysis should be done on the basis of patient location and specimen type. The percentage susceptibility of the most frequently isolated bacteria should be presented in the antibiogram, preferably in a tabular form. The antibiogram must be printed or put up in the intranet for easy access to all clinicians. Antibiotic policy is one of the mandatory requirements for accreditation, and making an antibiogram is the first step before framing the antibiotic policy. The future of antibiograms would be the incorporation of patient related data to make information more reliable and for predicting outbreaks.






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