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CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 83
 

Clinical microbiology for neonatal infections


Department of Neonatology, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, 244, A.J.C. Bose Road, Kolkata -700 020, India

Date of Submission19-Jun-2009
Date of Acceptance28-Jun-2009
Date of Web Publication6-Jan-2010

Correspondence Address:
R Viswanathan
Department of Neonatology, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, 244, A.J.C. Bose Road, Kolkata -700 020
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.58745

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How to cite this article:
Viswanathan R, Singh A K. Clinical microbiology for neonatal infections. Indian J Med Microbiol 2010;28:83

How to cite this URL:
Viswanathan R, Singh A K. Clinical microbiology for neonatal infections. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2010 [cited 2019 Nov 17];28:83. Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2010/28/1/83/58745


Dear Editor,

The guest editorial in the April 2009 issue of the journal discussed a topic of great relevance in today's changing medical scenario. Clinical microbiology is the need of the day. In this regard, we would like to share our experience in the field of clinical microbiology. Ours is the first independent Department of Neonatology in Eastern India. For the last two years we have been trying to implement the science of microbiology in a clinical setting. This idea was questioned as the hospital already has a microbiology set up which is a traditional laboratory based system. Through research and departmental funds, we set up an intradepartmental microbiology laboratory, with a medical microbiologist at the helm, to deal with neonatal infections. The services of this laboratory are also available to a sick newborn care unit in Birbhum district of West Bengal.

The use of automated systems for blood culture and bacterial identification has helped reduce the turnaround time for results. A day-to-day liaison between the microbiologist and clinical staff helps in swift decision making and management of individual patients. Such rapid communication was helpful in early detection of an outbreak of sepsis in the previous year. Weekly rounds are taken by the microbiologist and clinical faculty to monitor colonization and infection rates and usage of antibiotics. As a result, the microbiologist is learning the clinical aspects of neonatal infections and clinical staff learns not to take ad hoc decisions regarding antibiotics. The empirical use of antibiotics has decreased drastically as also sepsis related mortality.

A training undertaken by the microbiologist in the Microbiology and Infectious Disease Department at Children's Hospital, Westmead, Sydney has helped in better orientation and focusing of the work. Our unit is now a part of the Asia Pacific Neonatal Infection Surveillance (APNIS) study group headed by Prof David Isaacs.

Our model is an experimental one. We have faced several challenges at each step. We hope that this endeavour will inspire other institutions, if not specialised units, to develop the field of clinical microbiology.



This article has been cited by
1 Aetiology and antimicrobial resistance of neonatal sepsis at a tertiary care centre in eastern India: A 3 year study
Viswanathan, R., Singh, A.K., Mukherjee, S., Mukherjee, R., Das, P., Basu, S.
Indian Journal of Pediatrics. 2011; 78(4): 409-412
[Pubmed]
2 Aetiology and Antimicrobial Resistance of Neonatal Sepsis at a Tertiary Care Centre in Eastern India: A 3 Year Study
Rajlakshmi Viswanathan,Arun Kumarendu Singh,Suchandra Mukherjee,Ranajit Mukherjee,Parijat Das,Sulagna Basu
The Indian Journal of Pediatrics. 2011; 78(4): 409
[Pubmed] | [DOI]



 

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