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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 72-73

Pacing lead endocarditis due to Aspergillus fumigatus


1 Department of Microbiology, Max Heart and Vascular Institute, 2, Press Enclave Road, Saket, Delhi - 110 017, India
2 Department of Cardiac Surgery, Max Heart and Vascular Institute, 2, Press Enclave Road, Saket, Delhi - 110 017, India

Correspondence Address:
A Kothari
Department of Microbiology, Max Heart and Vascular Institute, 2, Press Enclave Road, Saket, Delhi - 110 017
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.58737

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Invasive aspergillosis is an opportunistic infection with a high mortality rate that usually occurs in the immunocompromised host. Several cases of fungal infections have been reported after cardiac surgery. We present here a case of Aspergillus fumigatus tricuspid valve endocarditis associated with permanent pacemaker leads. Tricuspid valve vegetectomy was done and the pacing leads were also removed. Culture from the excised vegetation grew Aspergillus fumigatus. The patient was started on IV Amphotericin B for eight weeks. The patient was subsequently followed up in the out-patient clinic, and remains afebrile after one year, with no evidence of any vegetation.






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2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow

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