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Year : 2010  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 45-47

Chlamydia trachomatis causing neonatal conjunctivitis in a tertiary care center


1 Department of Microbiology, Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Hospital, New Delhi -110 064, India
2 Department of Microbiology, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi- 110 002, India
3 Department of Paediatrics, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi - 110 002, India
4 Centre for AIDS and Related Diseases, National Institute of Communicable Diseases, New Delhi - 110 002, India

Correspondence Address:
P Bhalla
Department of Microbiology, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi- 110 002
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.58728

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Chlamydia trachomatis is considered a major aetiological agent of conjunctivitis in newborns. The objective of the present study was to determine the aetiology of neonatal conjunctivitis and clinico-epidemiological correlates of chlamydial ophthalmia neonatorum. Fifty-eight newborns with signs and symptoms of conjunctivitis were studied. Conjunctival specimens were subjected to Gram staining, routine bacteriological culture, culture for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) staining for diagnosis of C. trachomatis infection. C. trachomatis was detected in 18 (31%) neonates. Findings suggest that since C. trachomatis is the most common cause of neonatal conjunctivitis, routine screening and treatment of genital C. trachomatis infection in pregnant women and early diagnosis and treatment of neonatal Chlamydial conjunctivitis may be considered for its prevention and control.






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2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
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