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Year : 2007  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 53-56

Study of onychomycosis: Prevailing fungi and pattern of infection


Department of Microbiology, Government Medical College, Aurangabad - 431 001, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
N S Patwardhan
Department of Microbiology, Government Medical College, Aurangabad - 431 001, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.31063

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A mycological study of onychomycosis was undertaken in 88 patients. The nails were judged to be infected by their clinical appearance. Direct microscopy of the nail clips in 20% KOH solution was positive in 72 (81.8%) and culture was positive in 43 (48.8%) cases. Out of the samples cultured, dermatophytes were grown in 26 cases (29.5%), non dermatophyte moulds in 12 (13.6%) and Candida spp. in 5 (5.6%) while 45 (51.1%) samples yielded no growth. Amongst dermatophytes, T. rubrum was found to be commonest etiological agent (57.6%) followed by T. mentagrophyte . Amongst the non-dermatophyte mould (NDM), Aspergillus spp. was the most prevalent species followed by Alternaria spp, Curvularia spp. and Fusarium spp. Commonest age group affected was above 31 years. Males were predominantly affected (65%), male to female ratio being 1.8:1. Fingernails were affected more frequently than toe nails with the ratio of 3:1. Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis (DLSO) was more common (50%) than other clinical pattern followed by proximal subungual onychomycosis (PSO) (20.4%), white superficial onychomycosis (SWO) (2%), total dystrophic onychomysosis (TDO) (14%) and paronychia (10.2%).






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2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow

Online since April 2001, new site since 1st August '04