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 SPECIAL ARTICLE
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 4-6

Dedicated decontamination: A necessity to prevent cross contamination in high throughput mycobacteriology laboratories


P. D. Hinduja Hospital and MRC, Veer Savarkar Marg, Mahim (West), Mumbai - 400 016, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
C Rodrigues
P. D. Hinduja Hospital and MRC, Veer Savarkar Marg, Mahim (West), Mumbai - 400 016, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.31053

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Unrecognized cross-contamination has been known to occur in laboratories frequently, especially with sensitive recovery system like BACTEC 460 TB. In March 2001, we investigated a pseudo-outbreak of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in three smear negative clinical specimens and would like to present our experience in this communication. Methods : All suspected cases were confirmed by checking the drug susceptibility and DNA fingerprints using spoligotyping as well as restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results: On investigation, the most likely cause was found to be the use of common decontamination reagents and phosphate buffer. Conclusions: To avoid erroneous diagnosis, we have devised a dedicated decontamination procedure, which includes separate aliquoting of phosphate buffer and decontamination reagents per patient. Timely molecular analysis and appropriate changes to specimen processing have been identified as useful measures for limiting laboratory cross contamination.






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2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow

Online since April 2001, new site since 1st August '04