Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology IAMM  | About us |  Subscription |  e-Alerts  | Feedback |  Login   
  Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 Home | Ahead of Print | Current Issue | Archives | Search | Instructions  
Users Online: 389 Official Publication of Indian Association of Medical Microbiologists 
  Search
 
 ~ Next article
 ~ Previous article 
 ~ Table of Contents
  
 ~  Similar in PUBMED
 ~  Search Pubmed for
 ~  Search in Google Scholar for
 ~  Article in PDF (15 KB)
 ~  Citation Manager
 ~  Access Statistics
 ~  Reader Comments
 ~  Email Alert *
 ~  Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
 ~  References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed7842    
    Printed209    
    Emailed15    
    PDF Downloaded235    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 3    

Recommend this journal

 
CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2004  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 197
 

Bacteriological profile of street foods in Mangalore


Department of Microbiology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore - 575 001, Karnataka, India

Date of Submission10-Dec-2003
Date of Acceptance26-Dec-2003

Correspondence Address:
Department of Microbiology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore - 575 001, Karnataka, India



How to cite this article:
Bhaskar J, Usman M, Smitha S, Bhat G K. Bacteriological profile of street foods in Mangalore. Indian J Med Microbiol 2004;22:197


How to cite this URL:
Bhaskar J, Usman M, Smitha S, Bhat G K. Bacteriological profile of street foods in Mangalore. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2004 [cited 2019 Dec 6];22:197. Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2004/22/3/197/11221


Dear Editor,
Street food refers to a variety of food and beverages prepared and sold by vendors in streets and other public places for immediate consumption. Selling street foods is an important occupation in many cities in developing countries. As hygienic standards may not be maintained during the preparation of these food items, there is always concern about their safety, quality and hygiene.[1] We studied the bacteriological profile of street foods in Mangalore, south India.
Different locations in Mangalore were selected. Data regarding the items sold, method of preparation and serving, hygiene and method of washing the utensils were collected, maintaining total confidentiality. Samples of about 50 grams of food were collected in separate sterile containers and transported to the laboratory on ice within one hour of collection. Portions of food weighing 10 grams were diluted 1in10 using 90 mL phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.3). Further tenfold dilutions were made and examined by means of the surface viable count by spreading method on blood agar and MacConkey's agar.[2] Colony count and identification of bacteria were performed. Tests for food-poisoning bacteria was done by means of standard methods.[3]
Out of 60 street food samples tested, 56 (93%) were contaminated with bacteria [Table - 1]. Coliform count of > 105 cfu/g was detected in 21 samples. All the items which had high bacterial count were prepared and served in places where the washing of hands, utensils and dishes was done in buckets.
The present study revealed bacterial contamination of street foods. Presence of coliforms and enterococci indicate faecal contamination of the food suggesting possible risk of infection involved in consumption of such foods. Presence of  S.aureus  , an enterotoxin producer, can cause serious health problems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, another bacterium detected during the present study, is an important opportunistic pathogen and can cause food spoilage.[3] Washing of the hands, utensils and dishes in same bucket increases the chances of contamination. Food may also get contaminated if exposed to dust and flies. Health education for vendors and strict implementation of hygienic standards may help reduce contamination of street foods. 

 ~ References Top

1.Mensah P, Yeboah-Manu D, Owusu-Darko K, Ablordey A. Street foods in Accra, Ghana: how safe are they? Bull WHO 2002;80:546-554.  Back to cited text no. 1    
2.Brown R, Poxton IR. Centrifuges, colorimeters and bacterial counts, Chapter 48. In: Mackie and McCartney Practical Medical Microbiology, 14th ed, Collee Jg, Fraser Ag, Marmion BP, Simmons A (Eds). (Churchill Livingstone, New York) 1996: 845-852.  Back to cited text no. 2    
3.Senior BW. Examination of water, milk, food and air. Chapter 51. In: Mackie and McCartney Practical Medical Microbiology, 14th ed, Collee Jg, Fraser Ag, Marmion BP, Simmons A (Eds). (Churchill Livingstone, New York) 1996:883-921.  Back to cited text no. 3    
Top
Print this article  Email this article
Previous article Next article

    

2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow

Online since April 2001, new site since 1st August '04