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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2003  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 87-90

A study of diarrhoea among children in eastern Nepal with special reference to rotavirus


1 Departments of Microbiology, BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal
2 Departments of Pediatrics, BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal

Correspondence Address:
M Shariff
BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan
Nepal
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 17642988

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PURPOSE: To examine the incidence of Rotavirus infection in children below five years of age. METHODS: Faecal samples from 160 children under five years of age with acute gastroenteritis were collected over a period of one year from July 1999 to June 2000. These were studied for the presence of Rotavirus antigen by enzyme immuno assay (EIA). RESULTS: Rota antigen could be detected in 62 (38.7%) samples. Co-infection with other parasites or bacterial pathogens in presence of Rota antigen was also demonstrated. Forty one (66.4%) children were admitted for hospital care. Forty two samples positive by EIA were further tested by latex agglutination (LA) to consider introducing this test routinely in clinical laboratory. Although a rapid and convenient test, LA failed to demonstrate antigen in 15(35.6%) of the samples. CONCLUSIONS: Rotavirus infection of children in Nepal is reported for the first time. EIA was found to be more sensitive than LA for the detection of Rotavirus antigen in faecal samples.






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2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow

Online since April 2001, new site since 1st August '04