Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology IAMM  | About us |  Subscription |  e-Alerts  | Feedback |  Login   
  Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 Home | Ahead of Print | Current Issue | Archives | Search | Instructions  
Users Online: 843 Official Publication of Indian Association of Medical Microbiologists 
  Search
 
 ~ Next article
 ~ Previous article 
 ~ Table of Contents
  
 ~  Similar in PUBMED
 ~  Search Pubmed for
 ~  Search in Google Scholar for
 ~  [PDF Not available] *
 ~  Citation Manager
 ~  Access Statistics
 ~  Reader Comments
 ~  Email Alert *
 ~  Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
 ~  References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3783    
    Printed119    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded0    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 
Year : 2001  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 166
 

Reporting for cryptosporidium species in routine stool microscopy


Department of Microbiology, Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Thirupathi - 517 507, AP, India

Correspondence Address:
Department of Microbiology, Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Thirupathi - 517 507, AP, India



How to cite this article:
Chaudhury A. Reporting for cryptosporidium species in routine stool microscopy. Indian J Med Microbiol 2001;19:166


How to cite this URL:
Chaudhury A. Reporting for cryptosporidium species in routine stool microscopy. Indian J Med Microbiol [serial online] 2001 [cited 2019 Sep 17];19:166. Available from: http://www.ijmm.org/text.asp?2001/19/3/166/8158


Dear Editor,
Sethi et al in their article in July 2000 issue of IJMM have reported the trends in intestinal parasites in Chandigarh from 1988 to 1997.[1] However, they have made no mention about Cryptosporidium species, a protozoan parasite which is an important intestinal pathogen not only among the immunosuppressed but also the immunocompetent subjects.[2],[3] In one study from India its prevalence has been found to be 3.8% in children under 5 years age suffering from acute diarrhoea.[4] Another study from the same centre was done for a two year period comprising patients of all age groups.[5] The overall incidence was found to be 7.2% with the highest incidence of 11.4% among the age group 16-45 years. These and other studies from India and abroad stress the need for screening of this parasite in routine stool testing which is already in existence at the above laboratory and at our centre. Its incidence is likely to go up in the coming years as the large number of HIV positive cases enter the AIDS stage of the disease. 

 ~ References Top

1.Sethi S, Sehgal R, Malla N, Dubey ML, Mahajan RC. Changing trends of parasitic infections in Chandigarh (Northern India): Hospital based study. Ind J Med Microbio 2000;18(3): 106-109.  Back to cited text no. 1    
2.Angsu KW. Cryptosporidiosis in man, domestic animals, and birds : a review. J R Soc Med 1983;76: 62-70.  Back to cited text no. 2    
3.Current WL, Garcia LS. Cryptosporidiosis. Clin Microbiol Review 1991; 4: 325-358.  Back to cited text no. 3    
4.Nath G, Shukla BN, Reddy DCS, Sanyal SC. A community study on the aetiology of childhood diarrhoea with special reference to Campylobacter jejuni in a semiurban slum of Varnasi, India. J Diarrhoeal Dis Res 1993; 11: 165-168.  Back to cited text no. 4    
5.Nath G, Chaudhury A, Shukla BN, Singh TB, Reddy DCS. Significance of Cryptosporidium in acute diarrhoea in North-Eastern India. J Med Microbiol 1999; 48: 523-526.  Back to cited text no. 5    
Top
Print this article  Email this article
Previous article Next article

    

2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow

Online since April 2001, new site since 1st August '04