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Year : 1999  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 129-132

One year prospective study of 3280 surgical wounds


Department of Microbiology, Government Medical College, Aurangabad 431 001

Correspondence Address:
AR Anvikar
Department of Microbiology, Government Medical College, Aurangabad 431 001

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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ABSTRACT: A prospective study of 3280 surgical wounds was conducted. All the wounds were examined for the presence of infection; those with infection were studied bacteriologically. The overall infection rate was 6.09 percent. The infection rate in wounds following clean surgeries was 4.04 percent while in those following clean contaminated surgeries was 10.06 percent. The increase in the pre-operative hospitalization was associated with a significant rise in the rate of wound infection. There was a significant increase in the rate of infection as the duration of surgery increased. The rate of infection in emergency surgeries was not significantly higher than that in planned, elective surgeries. The infection rate was highest in post-appendicectomy wounds and lowest in the wounds following hydrocele surgeries. The infection rate was less in patients who received pre-operative antibiotics. The most common isolate in clean surgical wounds was Klebsiella pneumoniae followed by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggesting the emergence of K. pneumoniae as a hospital acquired pathogen. The strains were resistant to the commonly used antibiotics.






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2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow

Online since April 2001, new site since 1st August '04